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Quotations from Pope Francis

Pope Francis

   Social Justice Care for Creation
   Hunger Service
   Poverty Encounter
   Migrants and Refugees Indifference
   The Elderly  

SOCIAL JUSTICE 


I would like to ask all those who have positions of responsibility in economic, political and social life, and all men and women of goodwill: let us be ‘protectors’ of creation, protectors of God’s plan inscribed in nature, protectors of one another and of the environment.

March 19, 2013; Homily during Papal Inaugural Mass at St. Peter’s Basilica

 

This happens today: if the investments in the banks fall slightly... a tragedy... what can be done? But if people die of hunger, if they have nothing eat, if they have poor health, it does not matter! This is our crisis today!

May 18, 2013; Address on the Vigil of Pentecost, Vatican City

 

The world tells us to seek success, power and money; God tells us to seek humility, service and love.

June 2, 2013, via Twitter

 

Among our tasks as witnesses to the love of Christ is that of giving a voice to the cry of the poor.

June 14, 2013; Address to Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury

 

Every economic and political theory or action must set about providing each inhabitant of the planet with the minimum wherewithal to live in dignity and freedom, with the possibility of supporting a family, educating children, praising God and developing one's own human potential. This is the main thing; in the absence of such a vision, all economic activity is meaningless.

June 17, 2013; Letter to British Prime Minister David Cameron
on the Occasion of the G8 Meeting

 

A way has to be found to enable everyone to benefit from the fruits of the earth, and not simply to close the gap between the affluent and those who must be satisfied with the crumbs falling from the table, but above all to satisfy the demands of justice, fairness and respect for every human being.

June 20, 2013; Address to Participants in the 38th Conference of the
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

 

In the Gospel, we read the parable of the Good Samaritan, that speaks of a man assaulted and left half dead at the side of the road. People pass by him and look at him. But they do not stop, they just continue on their journey, indifferent to him: it is none of their business! How often do we say: it’s not my problem! How often do we turn the other way and pretend not to see! Only a Samaritan, a stranger, sees him, stops, lifts him up, takes him by the hand, and cares for him.

July 24, 2013; Visit to St. Francis of Assisi of the Providence
of God Hospital, Rio de Janiero

 

Accompanying on its own is not enough. It is not enough to offer someone a sandwich unless it is accompanied by the possibility of learning how to stand on one's own two feet. Charity that leaves the poor person as he is is not sufficient. True mercy, the mercy God gives to us and teaches us, demands justice, it demands that the poor find the way to be poor no longer. It asks - and it asks us, the Church, us, the City of Rome, it asks the institutions - to ensure that no one ever again stand in need of a soup-kitchen, of makeshift lodgings, of a service of legal assistance in order to have his legitimate right recognized to live and to work, to be fully a person.

September 10, 2013; Address during a visit to the Astalli Centre,
Jesuit Refugee Service in Rome

 

Each individual Christian and every community is called to be an instrument of God for the liberation and promotion of the poor, and for enabling them to be fully a part of society. This demands that we be docile and attentive to the cry of the poor and to come to their aid.

November 24, 2013; Evangelii Gaudium, 187

 

None of us can think we are exempt from concern for the poor and for social justice

April 26, 2014; via Twitter

 

Let us pray that the Church be holier and more humble, loving God by serving the poor, the lonely and the sick.

August 16, 2014; via Twitter

 

How much poverty and solitude we see in today's world, unfortunately! How many people live in conditions of great suffering and ask the Church to be a sign of the Lord's goodness, solidarity and mercy. This is a task, in particular, for those who have the responsibility of pastoral ministry. They are required to recognize and interpret these signs of the times in order to offer a wise and generous response.

September 20, 2014; Audience with Pontifical Council
for the Promotion of New Evangelization

 

No one is to be a “leftover.” No one is to be “excluded” from God’s love and from our care.

October 5, 2014; Message to Annual Meeting of Catholic Charities USA

 

Like in the story of the Good Samaritan, we are called to be like that Samaritan who stopped on his busy journey to care for his “neighbor,” and more so, we are called to be like the “inn-keeper” (Luke 10:35) remaining open to heal and provide a safe place for on-going care.

October 5, 2014; Message to Annual Meeting of Catholic Charities USA

 

Jesus gives us two faces, actually only one real face, that of God reflected in many faces, because in the face of each brother, especially of the smallest, the most fragile, the defenseless and needy, there is God's own image. And we must ask ourselves: when we meet one of these brothers, are we able to recognize the face of God in him? Are we able to do this? In this way, Jesus offers to all the fundamental criteria on which to base one's life.

October 26, 2014; Angelus message, St. Peter's Square


All political activity must serve and promote the good of the human person and be based on respect for his or her dignity. If politics must truly be at the service of the human person, it follows that it cannot be a slave to the economy and finance. Politics is, instead, an expression of our compelling need to live as one, in order to build as one the greatest common good: that of a community which sacrifices particular interests in order to share, in justice and peace, its goods, its interests, its social life.

September 24, 2015; Address before a Joint Meeting of the U.S. Congress

 
The firm commitment for human rights springs from an awareness of the unique and supreme value of each person.
May 20, 2016; via Twitter

 

HUNGER 

Let us remember well, however, that whenever food is thrown out it is as if it were stolen from the table of the poor, from the hungry!

June 5, 2013, Address during General Audience in St. Peter’s Square

 

This culture of waste has made us insensitive even to the waste and disposal of food, which is even more despicable when all over the world, unfortunately, many individuals and families are suffering from hunger and malnutrition.

June 5, 2013, Address during General Audience in St. Peter’s Square

 

Consumerism has accustomed us to waste. But throwing food away is like stealing it from the poor and hungry.

June 7, 2013; via Twitter

 

We cannot sleep peacefully while babies are dying of hunger and the elderly are without medical assistance.

August 17, 2013; via Twitter

 

It is a scandal that there is still hunger and malnutrition in the world! It is not just a question of responding to immediate emergencies, but of addressing together, at all levels, a problem that challenges our personal and social conscience, in order to achieve a just and lasting solution.

October 16, 2013; Message for World Food Day 2013

 

We are in front of a global scandal of around one billion - one billion people who still suffer from hunger today. We cannot look the other way and pretend this does not exist. The food available in the world is enough to feed everyone.

December 9, 2013; Message in support of Caritas Internationalis
initiative to end global hunger

 

Let us leave a spare place at our table: a place for those who lack the basics, who are alone.

January, 7, 2014; via Twitter

  

 

POVERTY 

 

People have to struggle to live and, frequently, to live in an undignified way. One cause of this situation, in my opinion, is in our relationship with money, and our acceptance of its power over ourselves and our society.

May 16, 2013; Address of Pope Francis to the
New Non-Resident Ambassadors to the Holy See

 

Poverty in the world is a scandal. In a world where there is so much wealth, so many resources to feed everyone, it is unfathomable that there are so many hungry children, that there are so many children without an education, so many poor persons. Poverty today is a cry. We all have to think if we can become a little poorer, all of us have to do this. How can I become a little poorer in order to be more like Jesus, who was the poor Teacher?

June 7, 2013; Meeting with students from Jesuit schools in Italy and Albania

 

You can't speak of poverty in the abstract: that doesn't exist. Poverty is the flesh of the poor Jesus, in that child who is hungry, in the one who is sick, in those unjust social structures.

June 7, 2013; Meeting with students from Jesuit schools in Italy and Albania

 

The measure of the greatness of a society is found in the way it treats those more in need, those who have nothing apart from their poverty.

July 25, 2013; via Twitter

 

There are so many people in need in today's world. Am I self-absorbed in my own concerns or am I aware of those who need help?

September 17, 2013; via Twitter

 

Let us ask the Lord to give us the gentleness to look upon the poor with understanding and love, devoid of human calculation and fear.

September 24, 2013; via Twitter

 

How can it be that it is not a news item when an elderly homeless person dies of exposure, but it is news when the stock market loses 2 points?

November 24, 2013; Evangelii Gaudium, 53

 

It is essential to draw near to new forms of poverty and vulnerability, in which we are called to recognize the suffering Christ, even if this appears to bring us no tangible and immediate benefits. I think of the homeless, the addicted, refugees, indigenous peoples, the elderly who are increasingly isolated and abandoned, and many others.

November 24, 2013; Evangelii Gaudium, 210

 

If we see someone who needs help, do we stop? There is so much suffering and poverty, and a great need for good Samaritans.

December 9, 2013; via Twitter

 

May we never get used to the poverty and decay around us. A Christian must act.

April 3, 2014; via Twitter

 

The fight against poverty and hunger must be fought constantly and on many fronts, especially in its causes. I know that many Americans today, as in the past, are working to deal with this problem.

September 24, 2015; Address before a Joint Meeting of the U.S. Congress

 

The Bible is very clear about this: there was no room for them. I can imagine Joseph, with his wife about to have a child, with no shelter, no home, no place to stay. The Son of God came into this world as a homeless person.

September 24, 2015; Address to Clients of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington



I want to be very clear. There is no social or moral justification, no justification whatsoever, for lack of housing.

September 24, 2015; Address to Clients of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington


The fight against poverty is not merely a technical economic problem, but above all a moral one, calling for global solidarity and the development of more equitable approaches to the concrete needs and aspirations of individuals and peoples worldwide.

May 13, 2016; Address of Pope Francis to Participants in the
International Conference of Centesimus Annus Pro Pontifice Foundation


An economy of exclusion and inequality has led to greater numbers of the disenfranchised and those discarded as unproductive and useless. The effects are felt even in our more developed societies, in which the growth of relative poverty and social decay represent a serious threat to families, the shrinking middle class and in a particular way our young people.

May 13, 2016; Address of Pope Francis to Participants in the
International Conference of Centesimus Annus Pro Pontifice Foundation



We need to “de-naturalize” extreme poverty, to stop seeing it as a statistic rather than a reality. Why? Because poverty has a face! It has the face of a child; it has the face of a family; it has the face of people, young and old. It has the face of widespread unemployment and lack of opportunity. It has the face of forced migrations, and of empty or destroyed homes.
June 13, 2016, Address of Pope Francis to the United Nations World Food Programme in Rome




MIGRANTS AND REFUGEES 

We pray for a heart which will embrace immigrants. God will judge us upon how we have treated the most needy.

July 8, 2013; via Twitter

 

These brothers and sisters of ours were trying to escape difficult situations to find some serenity and peace; they were looking for a better place for themselves and their families, but instead they found death. How often do such people fail to find understanding, fail to find acceptance, fail to find solidarity. And their cry rises up to God!

July 8, 2013; Homily, Mass in Lampedusa, Italy

 

While it is true that migrations often reveal failures and shortcomings on the part of States and the international community, they also point to the aspiration of humanity to enjoy a unity marked by respect for differences, by attitudes of acceptance and hospitality which enable an equitable sharing of the world’s goods, and by the protection and the advancement of the dignity and centrality of each human being

August 5, 2013; Message on World Day of Migrants and Refugees

 

While encouraging the development of a better world, we cannot remain silent about the scandal of poverty in its various forms. Violence, exploitation, discrimination, marginalization, restrictive approaches to fundamental freedoms, whether of individuals or of groups: these are some of the chief elements of poverty which need to be overcome. Often these are precisely the elements which mark migratory movements, thus linking migration to poverty.

August 5, 2013; Message on World Day of Migrants and Refugees

 

Migrants present a particular challenge for me, since I am the pastor of a Church without frontiers, a Church which considers herself mother to all. For this reason, I exhort all countries to a generous openness which, rather than fearing the loss of local identity, will prove capable of creating new forms of cultural synthesis. How beautiful are those cities which overcome paralyzing mistrust, integrate those who are different and make this very integration a new factor of development! How attractive are those cities which, even in their architectural design, are full of spaces which connect, relate and favor the recognition of others!

November 24, 2013; Evangelii Gaudium, 210

 

Grant that migrants in search of a dignified life may find acceptance and assistance. May tragedies like those we have witnessed this year, with so many deaths at Lampedusa, never occur again!

December 25, 2013; Urbi et Orbi message, Christmas Day 2013

 

Likewise, we cannot but be moved by the many refugees seeking minimally dignified living conditions, who not only fail to find hospitality, but often, tragically, perish in moving from place to place.

January 17, 2014; Message to the Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum

 

There are agencies and organizations on the international, national and local level which work strenuously to serve those seeking a better life through migration. Notwithstanding their generous and laudable efforts, a more decisive and constructive action is required, one which relies on a universal network of cooperation based on safeguarding the dignity and centrality of every human person

September 3, 2014; Message leading up to the commemoration
of World Day of Migrants and Refugees 2015

 

Solidarity with migrants and refugees must be accompanied by the courage and creativity necessary to develop, on a world-wide level, a more just and equitable financial and economic order, as well as an increasing commitment to peace, the indispensable condition for all authentic progress.

September 3, 2014; Message leading up to the commemoration
of World Day of Migrants and Refugees 2015

 

In recent centuries, millions of people came to this land to pursue their dream of building a future in freedom. We, the people of this continent, are not fearful of foreigners, because most of us were once foreigners.  I say this to you as the son of immigrants, knowing that so many of you are also descended from immigrants.

September 24, 2015; Address before a Joint Meeting of the U.S. Congress



Nonetheless, when the stranger in our midst appeals to us, we must not repeat the sins and the errors of the past. We must resolve now to live as nobly and as justly as possible, as we educate new generations not to turn their back on our “neighbors” and everything around us.

September 24, 2015; Address before a Joint Meeting of the U.S. Congress

 

Our world is facing a refugee crisis of a magnitude not seen since the Second World War. This presents us with great challenges and many hard decisions. On this continent, too, thousands of persons are led to travel north in search of a better life for themselves and for their loved ones, in search of greater opportunities. Is this not what we want for our own children? We must not be taken aback by their numbers, but rather view them as persons, seeing their faces and listening to their stories, trying to respond as best we can to their situation. To respond in a way which is always humane, just and fraternal.

September 24, 2015; Address before a Joint Meeting of the U.S. Congress


Refugees are not numbers, they are people who have faces, names, stories, and need to be treated as such.

April 16, 2016; via Twitter




THE ELDERLY 

We cannot sleep peacefully while babies are dying of hunger and the elderly are without medical assistance.

August 17, 2013; via Twitter

 

The "throw-away" culture produces many bitter fruits, from wasting food to isolating many elderly people.

October 25, 2013; via Twitter

 

No elderly person should be like an "exile" in our families. The elderly are a treasure for our society.

January 11, 2014; via Twitter

 

A society which abandons children and the elderly severs its roots and darkens its future.

May 6, 2014; via Twitter

 

Yet a culture of profit insists on casting off the old like a “weight”. Not only do they not produce — this culture thinks — but they are a burden: in short, what is the outcome of thinking like this? They are thrown away. It’s brutal to see how the elderly are thrown away, it is a brutal thing, it is a sin! No one dares to say it openly, but it’s done! There is something vile in this adherence to the throw-away culture. But we are accustomed to throwing people away. We want to remove our growing fear of weakness and vulnerability; but by doing so we increase in the elderly the anxiety of being poorly tolerated and neglected.

March 4, 2015; General Audience, St. Peter’s Square

 

Our elders are men and women, fathers and mothers, who came before us on our own road, in our own house, in our daily battle for a worthy life. They are men and women from whom we have received so much. The elder is not an alien. We are that elder: in the near or far future, but inevitably, even if we don’t think it. And if we don’t learn how to treat the elder better, that is how we will be treated.

March 4, 2015; General Audience, St. Peter’s Square

 

We old people are all a little fragile. Some, however, are particularly weak, many are alone, and stricken by illness. Some depend on the indispensable care and attention of others. Are we going to take a step back? Abandon them to their fate? A society without proximity, where gratuity and affection without compensation— between strangers as well — is disappearing, is a perverse society. The Church, faithful to the Word of God, cannot tolerate such degeneration. A Christian community in which proximity and gratuity are no longer considered indispensable is a society which would lose her soul. Where there is no honour for elders, there is no future for the young.

March 4, 2015; General Audience, St. Peter’s Square

 

Sometimes we case the elderly aside, but they are a precious treasure: to cast them aside is an inhustice and an irreparable loss.

June 17, 2014; via Twitter

 

  

CARE FOR CREATION 

Take care of God's creation. But above all, take care of people in need.

November 14, 2013; via Twitter

 

The urgent challenge to protect our common home includes a concern to bring the whole human family together to seek a sustainable and integral development, for we know that things can change. The Creator does not abandon us; he never forsakes his loving plan or repents of having created us. Humanity still has the ability to work together in building our common home.

May 24, 2015; Laudato Si, 13



The climate is a common good, belonging to all and meant for all. At the global level, it is a complex system linked to many of the essential conditions for human life.

May 24, 2015; Laudato Si, 23

 

There has been a tragic rise in the number of migrants seeking to flee from the growing poverty caused by environmental degradation. They are not recognized by international conventions as refugees; they bear the loss of the lives they have left behind, without enjoying any legal protection whatsoever. Sadly, there is widespread indifference to such suffering, which is even now taking place throughout our world. Our lack of response to these tragedies involving our brothers and sisters points to the loss of that sense of responsibility for our fellow men and women upon which all civil society is founded.

May 24, 2015; Laudato Si, 25

 

Even as the quality of available water is constantly diminishing, in some places there is a growing tendency, despite its scarcity, to privatize this resource, turning it into a commodity subject to the laws of the market. Yet access to safe drinkable water is a basic and universal human right, since it is essential to human survival and, as such, is a condition for the exercise of other human rights. Our world has a grave social debt towards the poor who lack access to drinking water, because they are denied the right to a life consistent with their inalienable dignity.

May 24, 2015; Laudato Si, 25



Human beings too are creatures of this world, enjoying a right to life and happiness, and endowed with unique dignity. So we cannot fail to consider the effects on people’s lives of environmental deterioration, current models of development and the throwaway culture.

May 24, 2015; Laudato Si, 43

 

This lack of physical contact and encounter, encouraged at times by the disintegration of our cities, can lead to a numbing of conscience and to tendentious analyses which neglect parts of reality. At times this attitude exists side by side with a “green” rhetoric. Today, however, we have to realize that a true ecological approach always becomes a social approach; it must integrate questions of justice in debates on the environment, so as to hear both the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.

May 24, 2015; Laudato Si, 49



A true ecological approach knows how to safeguard the environment and justice, hearing the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.

April 22, 2016; via Twitter

 

 

SERVICE 

How marvelous it would be if, at the end of the day, each of us could say: today I have performed an act of charity towards others!

April 29, 2013; via Twitter

To love God and neighbor is not something abstract, but profoundly concrete: it means seeing in every person and face of the Lord to be served, to serve him concretely. And you are, dear brothers and sisters, in the face of Jesus.

May 21, 2013; Address to the residents of Dono di Maria, a homeless shelter in Rome

 

When we are generous in welcoming people and sharing something with them—some food, a place in our homes, our time—not only do we no longer remain poor: we are enriched. I am well aware that when someone needing food knocks at your door, you always find a way of sharing food; as the proverb says, one can always ‘add more water to the beans’! Is it possible to add more water to the beans? Always? And you do so with love, demonstrating that true riches consist not in materials things, but in the heart! 

June 25, 2013; Visit to the Community of Varginha, Rio de Janiero

 

When you meet those most in need, your heart will begin to grow bigger, bigger and bigger! Because reaching out multiplies our capacity to love. An encounter with others makes our heart bigger. 

August 7, 2013; Message on the Feast of St. Catejan,
Patron Saint of the poor and unemployed

An excellent program for our lives: the Beatitudes and Matthew Chapter 25

August 21, 2013; via Twitter

 

That is the purpose of our mission: to identify the material and immaterial needs of the person and try to meet them as we can. Do you know what agape is? It is the love of others, as our Lord preached. It is not proselytizing, it is love. Love for one's neighbor, that leavening that serves the common good.

October 1, 2013; Interview with Eugenio Scalfari, La Reppublica

 

A faith which is lived out in a serious manner gives rise to acts of authentic charity.

October 31, 2013; Address to members of St. Peter's Circle

 

Every day we are all called to become a "caress of God" for those who perhaps have forgotten their first caresses, or perhaps who never have felt a caress in their life.

October 31, 2013; Address to members of St. Peter's Circle

 

Take care of God's creation. But above all, take care of people in need.

November 14, 2013; via Twitter

 

When we live out a spirituality of drawing nearer to others and seeking their welfare, our hearts are opened wide to the Lord's greatest and most beautiful gifts. Whenever we encounter another person in love, we learn something new about God. Whenever our eyes are opened to acknowledge the other, we grow in the light of faith and knowledge of God. If we want to advance in the spiritual life, then, we must constantly be missionaries.

November 24, 2013; Evangelii Gaudium, 272

 

To live charitably means not looking out for our own interests, but carrying the burdens of the weakest and poorest among us.

November 25, 2013; via Twitter

Holiness doesn't mean doing extraordinary things, but doing ordinary things with love and faith.

December 5, 2013; via Twitter

 

It is not enough to say we are Christians. We must live the faith, not only with our words, but with our actions.

January 20, 2014; via Twitter



Charity is born of the call of a God who continues to knock on our door, the door of all people, to invite us to love, to compassion, to service of one another.

September 24, 2015; Address to Clients of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington

 

ENCOUNTER 

We cannot keep ourselves shut up in parishes, in our communities, when so many people are waiting for the Gospel. It is not enough simply to open the door in welcome, but we must go out through that door and meet the people!

July 27, 2013; Homily, Mass in Rio de Janiero during World Youth Day

 

We are all jars of clay, fragile and poor, yet we carry within us an immense treasure.

August 9, 2013; via Twitter

 

Where we find hate and darkness, may we bring love and hope, in order to give a more human face to society.

September 30, 2013; via Twitter

 

Jesus teaches us to not be ashamed of touching human misery, of touching his flesh in our brothers and sisters who suffer.

April 10, 2014; via Twitter

 

Like the Good Samarian, may we not be ashamed of touching the wounds of those who suffer, but try to heal them with concrete acts of love.

June 5, 2014; via Twitter

 

Like the Good Samarian, may we not be ashamed of touching the wounds of those who suffer, but try to heal them with concrete acts of love.

June 5, 2014; via Twitter



Each one of us can be a bridge of encounter between diverse cultures and religions, a way to rediscover our common humanity.

May 21, 2016; via Twitter

 

INDIFFERENCE 

Let us look around: how many wounds are inflicted upon humanity by evil! Wars, violence, economic conflicts that hit the weakest, greed for money, power, corruption, divisions, crimes against human life and against creation.

March 24, 2013; Homily, Palm Sunday Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica

 

This happens today: if the investments in the banks fall slightly... a tragedy... what can be done? But if people die of hunger, if they have nothing eat, if they have poor health, it does not matter! This is our crisis today!

May 18, 2013; Address on the Vigil of Pentecost, Vatican City

 

This "culture of waste" tends to become the common mentality that infects everyone. Human life, the person is no longer perceived as a primary value to be respected and protected, especially if poor or disabled, if not yet useful - such as the unborn child - or no longer needed - such as the elderly. This culture of waste has made us insensitive even to the waste and disposal of food, which is even more despicable when all over the world, unfortunately, many individuals and families are suffering from hunger and malnutrition.

June 5, 2013; Address during General Audience in St. Peter’s Square

 

If we have found in Jesus meaning for our own lives, we cannot be indifferent to those who are suffering and sad.

June 22, 2013; via Twitter

 

How many of us, myself included, have lost our bearings; we are no longer attentive to the world in which we live; we don’t care; we don’t protect what God created for everyone, and we end up unable even to care for one another!

July 8, 2013; Homily, Mass in Lampedusa, Italy

 

Lord have mercy! Too often we are blinded by our comfortable lives, and refuse to see those dying at our doorstep.

October 12, 2013; via Twitter

 

Too often we participate in the globalization of indifference. May we strive instead to live global solidarity.

October 26, 2013; via Twitter

 

How can it be that it is not a news item when an elderly homeless person dies of exposure, but it is news when the stock market loses 2 points?

November 24, 2013; Evangelii Gaudium, 53

 

There is so much indifference in the face of suffering. May we overcome indifference with concrete acts of charity.

June 20, 2014; via Twitter



“Our life is made up of many things, a torrent of news, of many problems: all this leads us not to see, not to be aware of the problems of the people who are near us. Indifference seems to be a medicine that protects us from involvement, and becomes a way of being more relaxed. This is indifference. But this non-involvement is a way of defending our selfishness, and saddens us. The challenge of reality also requires the capacity for dialogue, to build bridges instead of walls. This is the time for dialogue, not for the defence of opposition and rigidity. I invite you to face 'the challenge of finding and sharing the mystique of living together, of mingling and encounter, of embracing and supporting one another, of stepping into this flood tide which, while chaotic, can become a genuine experience of fraternity, a caravan of solidarity, a sacred pilgrimage.'”

November 29, 2015; Video message to 5th Festival of the Social Doctrine of the Church